Retraction Watch

Tracking retractions as a window into the scientific process

Archive for the ‘ieee’ Category

One publisher appears to have retracted thousands of meeting abstracts. Yes, thousands.

with 14 comments

ieeeHere at Retraction Watch, we’ve covered somewhere shy of 2,000 retractions in our nearly five years of existence. With this post, we may be more than doubling that total count.

That’s because it looks like IEEE may have retracted thousands of meeting abstracts. Yes, thousands.

We don’t know the exact number, but a search for “retraction” in the abstracts of the 2011 International Conference on E-Business and E-Government (ICEE), held May 6-8 2011, brings up 1,281 results.

The same search on the site of the 5th International Conference on Bioinformatics and Biomedical Engineering (iCBBE), May 10-12, 2011, brings up 1,085 results.

We only opened the first few retraction notices, but they seem to all be the same. Headed “Notice of Retraction,” they read: Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Alison McCook

June 25th, 2015 at 3:30 pm

Posted in ieee

Springer, IEEE withdrawing more than 120 nonsense papers

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springerTwo major publishers will remove more than 120 papers created with random paper generator SCIgen, according to Nature.

Richard van Noorden, who has the scoop, reports:ieee Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ivan Oransky

February 24th, 2014 at 4:35 pm

Eight papers by anti-terrorism professor retracted for plagiarism

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Nasrullah Memon

Nasrullah Memon, via University of Southern Denmark

An anti-terrorism researcher at the University of Southern Denmark has had a number of papers in conference proceedings retracted for plagiarism.

Debora Weber-Wulff, who has researched plagiarism for a decade, reports on her blog Copy, Shake, and Paste that eight papers by Nasrullah Memon have been retracted after the Vroniplag website revealed similarities between his work and that of other authors.

According to a university website, Memon is Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ivan Oransky

January 16th, 2013 at 8:05 am