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Retraction Watch

Tracking retractions as a window into the scientific process

“I am not a monster and I am not unreasonable:” Student attacks professor with axe after grant is cut

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coimbraA physics graduate student at the University of Coimbra in Portugal attacked a professor with an axe earlier this month after losing a grant.

The student, Colin Paul Gloster, attacked physics lecturer Maria Filomena Santos, who according to the Irish Mirror will “require reconstructive surgery as the axe cut very close to the tendons.”

Speaking of the Irish Mirror story, Gloster tells Retraction Watch that “the main point that I axed someone is true.” But, he adds:

I am not a monster and I am not unreasonable.

According to the Irish Mirror: Read the rest of this entry »

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Written by Ivan Oransky

August 25, 2014 at 2:21 pm

Posted in portugal

Wasted breath: Cribbing earns retraction of anesthesia paper

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cbandbThe authors of a paper on anesthetic waste gases in the operating room have pulled the article for plagiarism.

The paper, titled “Further Pieces of Evidence to the Pulmonary Origin of Sevoflurane Escaping to the Operating Room During General Anaesthesia,” appeared in Cell Biochemistry and Biophysics and came from a group at various institutions in Harbin, China.

But according to the retraction notice, the further pieces weren’t really further, after all:
Read the rest of this entry »

New method sinks newish paper…or does it?

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cover_2009_BB_viz_biomassThe timing on a recent retraction of a paper from Biotechnology and Bioengineering makes it a bit difficult to figure out what happened, but here’s a try.

An article first published online May 16th by a group of researchers at Brown University was retracted on June 1st, apparently because a new and better method for analyzing the data was developed…at some point.

The timeline is not exactly clear from the retraction, though we’ve reached out to the author and publisher and will update with any new information.

Here’s the (paywalled) notice for “High-level production of 3-hydroxypropionatein Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae by introducing part of the 3-hydroxypropionate/4-hydroxybutyrate cycle from Metallosphaera sedula”:

Read the rest of this entry »

Weekend reads: Peer review abuse, a journal that will print anything for $1,200, PubPeer faces legal threats

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booksAnother busy week at Retraction Watch. Here’s what was happening elsewhere: Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ivan Oransky

August 23, 2014 at 9:30 am

Posted in weekend reads

Journal that “suffered” from plagiarism purges itself

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pharmpractWhen Pharmacy Practice found out it had been victimized by plagiarists, it apparently took the news personally — and to heart.

In an elaborate statement with more than a dozen references — but not one to the plagiarizing work — the journal lashed out against the behavior of word thieves, and described the discovery as a Road to Damascus moment.

Here’s the notice, which was published in 2012 but was only just indexed on PubMed:

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Adam Marcus

August 22, 2014 at 11:10 am

Diabetes researchers retract, correct and republish study on mortality rates

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diabetologiaA diabetes paper that received quite a bit of media attention when it was published in June 2013 was retracted and reissued to fix data errors shortly after publication.

The paper, which showed a steep decline in mortality rates for diabetics in Ontario, Canada, and the UK between 1996 and 2009, was republished in December 2013, with the same conclusion and the errors corrected.

Here’s the retraction notice for “Mortality trends in patients with and without diabetes in Ontario, Canada and the UK from 1996 to 2009: a population-based study”: Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Cat Ferguson

August 22, 2014 at 9:30 am

Second study of widely touted cancer and HIV “cure” retracted

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j med virologyLast month, we brought you the story of the retraction of a paper by Nobutu Yamamoto and colleagues about “a protein being used — unapproved by health agencies — to treat diseases including cancer and autism.”

A second paper by the group, about using the protein to treat HIV, has been retracted. Here’s the notice for “Immunotherapy of HIV-infected patients with Gc protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF),” from the Journal of Medical Virology:
Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ivan Oransky

August 21, 2014 at 4:00 pm

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