Retraction Watch

Tracking retractions as a window into the scientific process

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Authors in 2014 peer review ring lose 4 more papers each for “compromised” review

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human factors and ergonomicsA journal is pulling additional papers authored by twin brothers for peer review issues.

After retracting three papers by Cheng-Wu Chen earlier this year for “compromised” peer reviewHuman Factors and Ergonomics in Manufacturing & Service Industries is now pulling four more by Chen for the same reason — and four others by his twin brother, Chen-Yuan Chen, who was a the center of a peer review ring that SAGE busted in 2014.

Cheng-Wu Chen lost 21 papers during that episode. He’s now up to 28; Chen-Yuan Chen, who also goes by Peter Chen, is now up to 43. Both are present on our leaderboard.

The notes, which appear in the March/April issue of the journal, are all identical, and also cite issues with citations:

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Author in 2014 peer review ring loses 3 more papers for peer review problems

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cover (1)A journal is retracting three papers — including one that is highly cited — after learning the reviewers that recommended publication had conflicts of interest.

This is a case of family values gone awry: The author common to all papers is Cheng-Wu Chen at the National Kaohsiung Marine University in Taiwan, the twin brother of one Peter Chen, who was a the center of a peer review ring that SAGE busted in 2014 (and holder of the number #3 spot on our leaderboard). Cheng-Wu Chen apparently wasn’t an innocent bystander in that episode: Of the 60 retracted papers by SAGE, Cheng-Wu Chen was a co-author on 21.

The retraction notes for all three papers — published in Human Factors and Ergonomics in Manufacturing & Service Industries — are identical:

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The Retraction Watch Leaderboard

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Who has the most retractions? Here’s our unofficial list (see notes on methodology), which we’ll update as more information comes to light:

  1. Yoshitaka Fujii (total retractions: 183) Sources: Final report of investigating committee, our reporting
  2. Joachim Boldt (96) Sources: Editors in chief statement, additional coverage
  3. Diederik Stapel (58) Source: Our cataloging
  4. Adrian Maxim (48) Source: IEEE database
  5. Peter Chen (Chen-Yuan Chen) (43) Source: SAGE, our cataloging
  6. Hua Zhong (41) Source: Journal
  7. Shigeaki Kato (39) Source: Our cataloging
  8. James Hunton (37) Source: Our cataloging
  9. Hendrik Schön (36) Sources: PubMed and Thomson Scientific
  10. Hyung-In Moon (35) Source: Our cataloging
  11. Naoki Mori (32) Source: PubMed, our cataloging
  12. Tao Liu: (29) Source: Journal
  13. Cheng-Wu Chen (28) Source: our cataloging
  14. Gideon Goldstein (26)
  15. Scott Reuben (25)
  16. Gilson Khang (22) Sources: WebCitation.org, WebCitation.org, journal
  17. Friedhelm Herrmann (21)
  18. Noel Chia (21)
  19. Dipak Das (20) Click here for a full list of retracted papers
  20. Khalid Zaman (20)
  21. Jin Cheng (19)
  22. Bharat Aggarwal (18)
  23. Fazlul Sarkar (18)
  24. John Darsee (17)
  25. Wataru Matsuyama (17)
  26. Alirio Melendez (17)
  27. Robert Slutsky (17)
  28. Ulrich Lichtenthaler (16)
  29. Erin Potts-Kant (16)
  30. Stanley Rapoport (16)

We note that all but one of the top 30 are men, which agrees with the general findings of a 2013 paper suggesting that men are more likely to commit fraud.

Notes:

Many accounts of the John Darsee story cite 80-plus retractions, which would place him third on the list, but Web of Science only lists 17, three of which are categorized as corrections. That’s not the only discrepancy. For example, Fujii has 138 retractions listed in Web of Science, compared to 183 as recommended by a university committee, while Reuben has 25, compared to the 22 named in this paper. We know that not everything ends up in Web of Science — Chen, for example, isn’t there at all — so we’ve used our judgment based on covering these cases to arrive at the highest numbers we could verify.

Shigeaki Kato is likely to end up with 43 retractions, based on the results of a university investigation.

All of this is a good reminder why the database we’re building with the generous support of the MacArthur Foundation and Arnold Foundation will be useful.

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Written by Ivan Oransky

June 16th, 2015 at 11:09 am

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