Retraction Watch

Tracking retractions as a window into the scientific process

Diederik Stapel retraction count updated to 57

with one comment

stapel_npcWe’ve learned about two more retractions we missed for Diederick Stapel, the Dutch social psychology researcher who has now racked up a total of 57 retractions by our count.

Both retractions were issued after a committee released a report which established fraud in dozens of papers co-authored by Stapel.

Stapel is still #4 on our leaderboard.

One of the retractions is for a chapter in a 2010 book Emotion Regulation and Well-Being. The chapter, “From (Unconscious) Perception to Emotion: A Global-to-Specific Unfolding View of Emotional Responding. Emotion Regulation and Well-Being,” looked at the link between perception and emotion.

The chapter was authored by Stapel, Kirsten Ruys and Henk Aarts. Ruys is also a co-author with Stapel on several other retracted papers. It has been cited twice, according to Thomson Scientific’s Web of Knowledge.

Here’s the notice:

Reason: This chapter has been retracted because the Editors were informed by the Levelt Committee that the chapter was based on falsified research and/or fabricated data

We can’t tell when exactly the notice appeared, but its copyright is listed as 2011.

The other retracted paper was published in 1998 in Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes. “Interpretation versus Reference Framing: Assimilation and Contrast Effects in the Organizational Domain Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes,” examined how context information affects strategic decision making in three experiments.

It has been cited twice and was co-authored by Stapel and William Koomen, who was also a co-author on other retracted papers.

The notice, published online in 2014, reads:

This article has been retracted: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal (http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy).

This article has been retracted upon the request of the Editor and on behalf of co-author Willem Koomen. The Levelt Committee, formed by Tilburg University, the Netherlands to investigate the research of first author Diederik Stapel, has concluded that this article contained evidence of fraud…

We’ve still haven’t heard from Stapel since he told us last year that he had resigned from a teaching position at Fontys Academy and admitted to leaving comments under a pseudonym on Retraction Watch.

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Comments
  • Jim Thornton October 20, 2015 at 1:50 pm

    Surprised you resisted the title “57 Varieties of Fraud”.

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