Retraction Watch

Tracking retractions as a window into the scientific process

Archive for the ‘diederik stapel’ Category

Diederik Stapel speaks

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stapel_npcDiederik Stapel, the social psychologist who has now retracted 54 papers, recently spoke as part of the TEDx Braintrain, which took place on a trip from Maastricht to Amsterdam. Among other things, he says he lost his moral compass, but that it’s back.

Here’s the talk, which lasts 17 minutes: Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ivan Oransky

September 4th, 2013 at 8:36 pm

Posted in diederik stapel

Measure by measure: Diederik Stapel count rises again, to 54

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stapel_npcDiederik Stapel is up to 54 retractions.

Here’s the notice from Self and Identity: Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ivan Oransky

August 2nd, 2013 at 12:30 pm

Diederik Stapel settles with Dutch prosecutors, won’t face jail time

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stapel_npcDiederik Stapel, the former Tilburg University psychology professor who has retracted 53 papers because he made up the data, has settled with Dutch prosecutors, who began a criminal probe of his case last year.

Stapel will do 120 hours of community service, and decline disability and illness benefits that would have added up to 18 months’ worth of salary, according to reports in the Dutch press. Apparently, it helped his case that he had voluntarily given up his PhD.

A rough translation by a Retraction Watch reader: Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ivan Oransky

June 28th, 2013 at 6:30 am

“Unfinished business”: Diederik Stapel retraction count rises to 53

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stapel_npcTwo more papers by Diederik Stapel — who was profiled by The New York Times Magazine this weekend — have been retracted, both in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology.

The notice for “Hardly thinking about close and distant others: On cognitive business and target closeness in social comparison effects,” by Stapel and David Marx, and cited six times: Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ivan Oransky

April 30th, 2013 at 1:00 pm

Frequent Retraction Watch fliers rack them up: Stapel hits 51, Lichtenthaler scores number 9

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freq flyer

Rewards may vary

Quick updates on work by two people whose names appear frequently on Retraction Watch: Diederik Stapel and Ulrich Lichtenthaler.

Last month, we reported on the 50th retraction for Stapel. Here’s number 51 in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, for “The flexible unconscious: Investigating the judgmental impact of varieties of unaware perception:” Read the rest of this entry »

Diederik Stapel retraction count hits 50

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stapel_npcIt’s Diederik Stapel’s golden retraction: Number 50.

The lucky notice appears in Social Psychology: Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ivan Oransky

March 22nd, 2013 at 2:00 pm

“When we wonder what it all means”: Stapel retraction count rises to 49

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stapel_npcDiederik Stapel is up to 49 retractions.

Here are the latest three, from Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin: Read the rest of this entry »

Retraction 46 arrives for Diederik Stapel

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stapel_npcDiederik Stapel has a new retraction, his 46th.

Here’s the notice for “The effects of diffuse and distinct affect. ” by Diederik A. Stapel, Willem Koomen and Kirsten I. Ruys, which appeared in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology in 2002: Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ivan Oransky

February 5th, 2013 at 11:26 am

Stapel watch reaches 45 retractions

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stapel_npcKeeping up with the retraction count of Diederik Stapel is proving to be a, well, staple of this job. Four more retractions brings the figure to 45.

The articles in question are: Read the rest of this entry »

This is 40 (and 41): More retractions for Diederik Stapel

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stapel_npcIt turns out we missed two more recent retractions from Diederik Stapel. They were nestled in the table of contents of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology that contained four retractions we covered last week.

The notices, for “Method matters: Effects of explicit versus implicit social comparisons on activation, behavior, and self views” (cited 48 times, according to Thomson Scientific’s Web of Knowledge) and “From seeing to being: Subliminal social comparisons affect implicit and explicit self-evaluations” (cited 95 times), both say the same thing: Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ivan Oransky

January 24th, 2013 at 10:42 am