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Retraction Watch

Tracking retractions as a window into the scientific process

Cancer researcher has correction upgraded to retraction

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mol endo coverRakesh Kumar, a researcher with six recent corrections and one retraction, has had one of those corrections upgraded to a retraction.

Here’s the unhelpful notice, from Molecular Endocrinology: Read the rest of this entry »

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Journal takes down autism-vaccine paper pending investigation

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translational neurodegenerationAn article purporting to find that black children are at substantially increased risk for autism after early exposure to the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine has been shelved.

Although we don’t know if the events are related, the move comes amid claims that a CDC whistleblower has accused health officials of suppressing information about the link.

Not surprisingly, the prospect that the CDC has been sitting on evidence of an autism-vaccine connection for more than a decade has inflamed the community of activists wrongly convinced that such a link exists.

The paper, “Measles-mumps-rubella vaccination timing and autism among young african american boys: a reanalysis of CDC data,” was written by Brian Hooker, an engineer-turned-biologist and an active member of that community. It was submitted in April, accepted on August 5, and published on August 8.

Translational Neurodegeneration, which published the article earlier this month, has now removed it and posted the following notice: Read the rest of this entry »

This retraction has teeth: Journal changes publication policy after discovering misconduct

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Screen Shot 2014-08-26 at 10.43.29 AMThe Indian Society of Periodontology has changed their editorial policy as the result of an author who had “neither taken adequate permission from nor given due acknowledgement to all authors concerned.”

Now, any authors will be required to sign a contract acknowledging accountability for the content of the submitted paper, as well as be able to state the specific work contributed by each author.

Here’s the notice from the Journal of the Indian Society of Periodontology: Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Cat Ferguson

August 27, 2014 at 11:30 am

Language of a liar named Stapel: Can word choice be used to identify scientific fraud?

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stapel_npcA pair of Cornell researchers have analyzed the works of fraudster Diederik Stapel and found linguistic tics that stand out in his fabricated articles.

David Markowitz and Jeffrey Hancock looked at 49 of the Dutch social psychologist’s papers — 24 of which included falsified data. (Stapel has lost 54 papers so far.)

According to the abstract for the article, “Linguistic Traces of a Scientific Fraud: The Case of Diederik Stapel,” which appeared in PLoS ONE: Read the rest of this entry »

Written by amarcus41

August 27, 2014 at 9:30 am

“Our jaws hit the floor!!” Researchers say authors doctored images for rebuttal letter

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eurourologyTry to follow along on this one. We think it’s worth it.

The authors of a letter replying to a comment in a urology journal have retracted their response because it contained inappropriate figures. At least, that’s the official story.

The original paper, “Effect of a Risk-stratified Grade of Nerve-sparing Technique on Early Return of Continence After Robot-assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy,” came from a group at Weill Medical College of Cornell University led by Ashutosh Tewari. Published in July 2012 in European Urology, it purported to find that: Read the rest of this entry »

Incomplete reference helps editor find duplicate paper — and retract article

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botswanaPro-tip: If you’re going to try to publish your work twice, don’t give editors a reason to go searching the internet for your previous work.

Here’s case in point, a retraction notice from the Botswana Journal of Agriculture & Applied Sciences: Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ivan Oransky

August 26, 2014 at 9:30 am

“I am not a monster and I am not unreasonable:” Student attacks professor with axe after grant is cut

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coimbraA physics graduate student at the University of Coimbra in Portugal attacked a professor with an axe earlier this month after losing a grant.

The student, Colin Paul Gloster, attacked physics lecturer Maria Filomena Santos, who according to the Irish Mirror will “require reconstructive surgery as the axe cut very close to the tendons.”

Speaking of the Irish Mirror story, Gloster tells Retraction Watch that “the main point that I axed someone is true.” But, he adds:

I am not a monster and I am not unreasonable.

According to the Irish Mirror: Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ivan Oransky

August 25, 2014 at 2:21 pm

Posted in portugal

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