Retraction Watch

Tracking retractions as a window into the scientific process

Leukemia paper retracted for plagiarism — 18 years later

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BTER_116_1_cvr_spine.p65Nearly two decades after a Polish researcher plagiarized the work of a Turkish team, her theft has been exposed and the paper retracted.

According to an article in Polish-language paper Gazeta Wyborcza, Jolanta Rzymowska of the Medical University of Lublin was the subject of two disciplinary hearings, the first in February 2014, following the discovery of her plagiarism by well-known Polish fraud hunter Marek Wronski. It was determined that her 1996 paper contained word-for-word text from a paper by a team at the University of Ankara.

Ultimately, Rzymowska was given an official reprimand, rather than any harsher disciplinary action, because she copied descriptions rather than results. From a Google translation of the article: Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Cat Ferguson

November 18th, 2014 at 9:30 am

Fake citations plague some Google Scholar profiles

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lw20

One of the “articles” that was linked to Bucci’s Scholar profile last week (click for full-size)

Last week, microbiologist Enrico Bucci emailed us with concerns that several of the citations listed on his Google Scholar profile were fake.

Colleagues of his had noticed the same problem on their pages.

The listings seem to be real titles, researchers, and publications, but scrambled. When Bucci first spoke with us, the Scholar citations all linked to clearly fake pages on a site hosted by e-commerce giant Alibaba. You can see an example here (that’s a screenshot on the right). Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Cat Ferguson

November 17th, 2014 at 2:22 pm

Posted in faked data

Engineer in South Korea forced to retract ten papers in one fell swoop

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metals and materials internationalChang-Suk Han, a member of the engineering faculty at Hoseo University in South Korea, has had ten articles retracted at once because of duplicated data.

Here are the ten studies from Metals and Materials International: Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ivan Oransky

November 17th, 2014 at 11:39 am

Retraction appears for faked study of Novartis anti-cancer compound

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Raymond Sawaya, director of MD Anderson’s brain tumor program, presents Jun Fu with the 2014 Caroline Ross Endowment Fellowship.

Raymond Sawaya, director of MD Anderson’s brain tumor program, presents Jun Fu with the 2014 Caroline Ross Endowment Fellowship.

A paper by a former postdoc at MD Anderson Cancer Center who “admitted to knowingly and intentionally falsifying” a figure has been retracted.

In August, the Office of Research Integrity announced that it had sanctioned Jun Fu for faking data in a study of the results of a mouse study of NVP-HSP990, a Novartis compound designed to fight brain tumors. Here’s the notice for the study in question, published in Cancer Research:
Read the rest of this entry »

Weekend reads: Speed kills in publishing too; studying blank pages; apologies for the Rosetta Shirt

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booksHighlights at Retraction Watch this week included a case of overly honest referencing and the story of how a medical resident flagged up a pseudoscientific study. Here’s what was happening elsewhere: Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ivan Oransky

November 15th, 2014 at 9:30 am

Posted in weekend reads

Paper on circulating tumor cells taken out of circulation after lab error

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medical oncologyA group of researchers at the Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences in Guangzhou, China have retracted a paper that came out of a clinical trial on transarterial chemoembolization, a targeted kind of chemotherapy.

According to the notice, one of the authors mixed up the control samples with the clinical samples, and “could not recall which samples were in the wrong group.” The paper hasn’t yet been cited, according to Thomson Scientific’s Web of Knowledge.

Here’s the notice in Medical Oncology:

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Cat Ferguson

November 14th, 2014 at 11:30 am

Univ.: No misconduct, but “poor research practice” in mgt prof’s work now subject to 7 retractions

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fred-walumbwa

Fred Walumbwa

The Leadership Quarterly has retracted a trio of papers by Frederick Walumbwa, an “ethical leadership” guru at Florida International University, whose work has come under scrutiny for flawed methodology. And another journal  has pulled one of his articles for similar reasons. That brings his count – as far as we can tell — to seven retractions and a mega-correction.

Meanwhile, Arizona State University, Walumbwa’s former employer, has found

that the preponderance of evidence does not support the charge of research misconduct by Dr. Walumbwa…

but that he engaged in “poor research practice.”

The bottom line, according to the Leadership Quarterly, which first announced problems with the articles in February:

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by amarcus41

November 14th, 2014 at 9:30 am

Professor defends ripping off his student by insulting him in the media

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Shahid Azam

University of Regina professor Shahid Azam is the kind of thesis advisor that gives prospective grad students nightmares.

According to the CBC, Azam lost a paper in Environmental Geotechnics for plagiarizing the work of his student, Arjun Paul, without bothering to cite it. Azam went on to trash the student’s ability to the CBC reporter.

He’s got two excuses, but we’re not sure which is more repugnant – that he wrote much of his student’s thesis for him and so deserves to steal it, or that plagiarism is standard practice in engineering publishing.

From the CBC: Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Cat Ferguson

November 13th, 2014 at 2:27 pm

Posted in canada

Publisher sets high bar: Only articles “with lowest plagiarism” will be accepted

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jipbsMaybe you can be a little bit pregnant after all.

At least, that’s what the editors of the Journal of Innovations in Pharmaceutical and Biological Sciences would have submitters believe.

In a rather ham-handed invitation to authors received by a friend of Retraction Watch, the open-access journal “cordially” solicits papers with a helpful illustrated timeline (our comments in parentheses): Read the rest of this entry »

Written by amarcus41

November 13th, 2014 at 10:17 am

Lancet journal puts ICU paper on watch after authors acknowledge potentially fatal flaw

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lancetrmLancet Respiratory Medicine has issued an expression of concern for a meta-analysis on tracheostomy in the intensive care unit that they published earlier this year.

The paper, “Effect of early versus late or no tracheostomy on mortality of critically ill patients receiving mechanical ventilation: a systematic review and meta-analysis“, came from a group at Harvard, Weill Cornell and the University of Athens. The authors purported to find that: Read the rest of this entry »