Retraction Watch

Tracking retractions as a window into the scientific process

Weekend reads: Papers from prison; profs’ kids as co-authors; a history journal flap

with 3 comments

The week at Retraction Watch featured a look at whether scientists in industry or academia admit to more misconduct, another strange publication twist for a vaccine study, and the correction of a study that claimed anti-gay attitudes could take more than a decade off of gay peoples’ lifespans. Here’s what was happening elsewhere:

Like Retraction Watch? You can make a tax-deductible contribution to support our growth, follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, add us to your RSS reader, sign up on our homepage for an email every time there’s a new post, or subscribe to our daily digest. If you find a retraction that’s not in our database, you can let us know here. For comments or feedback, email us at retractionwatchteam@gmail.com.

Written by Ivan Oransky

February 3rd, 2018 at 9:21 am

Posted in weekend reads

Comments
  • Akhlesh February 4, 2018 at 12:49 pm

    In re child co-authors of professor parents in South Korea, the following data from the news article are worth noting: “Of the 82 cases that included offspring attribution, some 43 cases listed offspring as co-authors for ‘no valid reason’, according to the ministry study. The remainder were associated with programmes where secondary school students link with universities that help them write research papers.” So some cases of co-authorship are genuine, but not all.

  • Miguel Roig February 4, 2018 at 3:46 pm

    “The remainder were associated with programmes where secondary school students link with universities that help them write research papers.” So some cases of co-authorship are genuine, but not all.”

    Well, not necessarily. The question always arises as to whether these students’ contributions to the papers are substantive enough to merit authorship as per most established guidelines. If yes, fine. If not then one negative outcome of unmerited authorship is that the student may be assumed to possess a level of expertise that, in reality, s/he lacks, giving that student an unfair advantage over others who are competing for the same scholarship award, or seat in a college or graduate program.

  • JCalvertN(UK) February 17, 2018 at 9:03 am

    Re: 1000+ author papers; that must be about one word per author!
    If we assume that some of the more senior authors may have hogged an entire sentence to themselves, that leaves the junior authors tussling for the authorship of a single word!

  • Post a comment

    Threaded commenting powered by interconnect/it code.

Follow

Follow this blog

Get every new post delivered right to your inbox.

Email address