Retraction Watch

Tracking retractions as a window into the scientific process

PubPeer Selections: Corrections in PNAS, PLOS Pathogens after PubPeer critiques; how old is too old?

with 13 comments

pubpeerHere’s another installment of PubPeer Selections:

 

Written by Ivan Oransky

November 11th, 2014 at 11:39 am

Posted in pubpeer selections

Comments
  • Lo Mein November 11, 2014 at 11:57 am

    Is there any list specifying all the PubPeer comments leading to actual errata / corrections / retractions ?

    This could be a useful resource whenever arguing post-publication peer review, and will also enable the collection of statistics, progress over time etc…

  • JATdS November 11, 2014 at 2:00 pm

    The problem with old papers is that most if not all of the authors may have already deceased. So, queries will never be answered, and concerns never resolved. Even worse, the institutes where they worked will just wash their hands free of responsibility. One classical case for me is that of the now-deceased Prof. Abraham Halevy who has a heavily (estimated > 75%) self-plagiarized paper in Acta Horticulturae. Even though the institute was officially informed (all 30 members in fact), the paper remains intact, as does Prof. Halevy’s legacy. And the institute (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, The Robert H. Smith Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics in Agriculture) has taken absolutely no measures to correct the literature or to issue a post-humus expression of concern. Neither has the publisher, the International Society for Horticultural Science, taken any measures to deal with this problem. The situation is really dire, I believe. That is why there is urgency to hold authors, editors and publishers accountable for journal content NOW. The lack of accountability, particularly by the latter two groups, is starting to build up, like a pressure cooker. And we all know what happens to a pressure cooker on full steam when the whistle is screaming, and we leave the heat turned on high.
    [1] http://retractionwatch.com/2014/01/25/weekend-reads-trying-unsuccessfully-to-correct-the-scientific-record-drug-company-funding-and-research/#comments (see response to Bouzid Nasraoui, July 26, 2014).

  • BB November 11, 2014 at 2:36 pm

    That comment on the 1980 paper caused me to raise an eyebrow, especially the way how the commenter casually requests extra raw data (“Blood pressure data of the patients should be provided”) for a paper published 34 years ago. Not to mention that unfortunately the last author and PI on that project (Prof. Collins) passed away in 2010 (http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2011/04/john-j-collins-jr/)

    Moreover the actual data acqusition started much earlier than 1980 (01.01.1974), at a time when Nixon was still in office… Now, I’m all for transparency and data archiving but somewhere the line has to be drawn between PPPR and armchair archeology. I nevertheless wish the commenter good luck for getting those pre-Watergate data (most likely as a pile of punch cards).

  • Jennifer Lopez November 12, 2014 at 4:56 am
  • Harish Padh query November 13, 2014 at 3:14 pm

    A case of potential self-plagiarism. Neither paper references, or acknowledges the existence of, the other paper.

    [P-1] Padh H (1990) Cellular functions of ascorbic acid. Biochem Cell Biol 68:1166–1173. doi: 10.1139/o90-173
    (NRC Research Press) (310 citations Google scholar citation)
    http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/abs/10.1139/o90-173
    [P-2] Padh H (1991) Vitamin C: newer insights into its biochemical functions. Nutr Rev 49:65–70. doi: 10.1111/j.1753-4887.1991.tb07407.x (202 citations Google scholar citation)
    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1753-4887.1991.tb07407.x/abstract

    Problems:
    P-1 is used as a blueprint and more than 65% of the text in P-2 has been copied or slightly edited from P-1.
    The structure of both reviews is identical, except for one new section in P-2, and a modified conclusions section.
    Table 1 data of P-1 and P-2 is the same.
    Several figures are the same, but with altered representations.

    Funding:
    In P-1, the work was supported by the National Institutes of Health grant DK26678 while in P-2 there is no acknowledgement to a source of funding.

    Professor Harish Padh is the Vice Chancellor of Sardar Patel University http://www.spuvvn.edu/administration/vice_chancellors_office/index.php
    http://www.spuvvn.edu/about/vcs_desk/

    Professor Harish Padh is also the former Director of the PERD Research Centre (http://www.perdcentre.com/)

    CV of Professor H Padh:
    http://www.spuvvn.edu/about/vcs_desk/HPCV/HPCV-1011R.pdf
    Contact: e.g. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4044520/pdf/1755-8166-7-S1-I52.pdf

  • Harish Padh query November 14, 2014 at 1:28 pm

    The same queries now officially at PubPeer:
    https://pubpeer.com/publications/CCC35BF0DE5965C962DF7292B5FF33
    https://pubpeer.com/publications/303A5BDC72F37169395AF7F58A3244
    Prof. Padh will now be formally invited to respond to RW and PubPeer.

    • Harish Padh query December 10, 2015 at 1:04 am

      The following editorial has appeared at Nutrition Reviews.
      http://nutritionreviews.oxfordjournals.org/content/49/3/65

      Publisher’s Note

      The article titled “Vitamin C: newer insights into its biochemical functions” (Nutr Rev 49:65–70) was published in print in the March 1991 issue of Nutrition Reviews. Much of the text in this article was recycled from the article titled “Cellular functions of ascorbic acid” (Biochem Cell Biol 68:1166–1173), which was published in the October 1990 issue of Biochemistry and Cell Biology and targeted toward a different audience. While that publication was cited in the article that appeared in Nutrition Reviews, it was not referenced at each place identical text was used. The Editors of both publications agree that, while this practice of text recycling is not condoned in current research publications, it was an accepted practice at the time of original publication. As per COPE’s Text Recycling Guidelines1, this case was evaluated with that in mind. This notification is offered to ensure the accuracy of the scientific record.

      1 http://publicationethics.org/text-recycling-guidelines

  • Andrew Dalke November 15, 2014 at 12:33 am

    How far back should review go?

    I submitted a comment at https://pubpeer.com/publications/2ADDB9CA68AD6F5A4176580C219B7A for two papers from 1966. Its “figure 2” and the “figure 2” from the previous paper were swapped. I figured that it might help someone in the future figure out what was going on.

  • SS November 18, 2014 at 10:36 am

    18 Year Later paper is retracted received notification from RW today
    http://retractionwatch.com/2014/11/18/leukemia-paper-retracted-for-plagiarism-18-years-later/

  • SS November 18, 2014 at 11:40 am

    What I think is there is nothing is too old for paper retraction. If any author and handling Editor at that time (past paper) is/are deceased, and If Present editor of journal found any unethical means cum misconduct/copy right violation/plagiarism or other It can be retracted by Present Editor. I Appreciate retraction notice available on Two Springer Journals for more information see the link provided below.

    1940 paper is retracted Author is (Max Planck) from Berlin
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2FBF01488952?LI=true

    1942 paper is Retracted
    http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2FBF01475382

    In conclusion there is no too late for any retraction.

  • SS November 18, 2014 at 11:47 am

    Retraction post of RW appeared in 2012 entitled “A new record: A retraction, 27 years later”
    So there is no too old
    http://retractionwatch.com/2012/12/04/a-new-record-a-retraction-27-years-later/

  • JATdS November 21, 2014 at 11:00 am

    Not retracted, but two out of three have errata. The papers go back a centur, and more. Enjoy.

    Analyse und Konstitutionsermittelung organischer Verbindungen 1903, pp 43-93
    Kriterien der chemischen Reinheit und Identitätsproben. Bestimmung der physikalischen Konstanten
    Dr. Hans Meyer
    http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-662-38500-5_2
    DOI: 10.1007/978-3-662-38500-5_2
    Abstract:
    Zusammenfassung
    Als „chemisch rein,, bezeichnen wir eine Substanz, wenn sie keinerlei durch die Methoden der Analyse nachweisbare Verunreinigungen enthält. Je nach der Richtung, in der sich die beabsichtigte Untersuchung erstreckt, ist ein verschieden hoher Grad der Reinheit von Nöten: So werden gewisse Verunreinigungen, z. B. ein wenig Feuchtigkeit, das Resultat einer Methoxylbestimmung kaum alterieren, während die Elementaranalyse dadurch vereitelt wird. Auf jeden Fall wird man trachten, die zu untersuchende Substanz tunlichst zu reinigen ; als Kontrolle für das Vorliegen eines einheitlichen Körpers dienen dabei die physikalischen Konstanten. Erfahrungsgemäss zeigt jeder Körper, falls er nicht besonders zersetzlich ist, in krystallinischer Form einen bestimmten Schmelzpunkt, als Flüssigkeit konstanten Siedepunkt. Weitere wertvolle Daten können die Bestimmung der Löslichkeit und des spezifischen Gewichtes geben.

    Analyse und Konstitutionsermittelung organischer Verbindungen 1909, pp 86-142
    Kriterien der chemischen Reinheit und Identitätsproben. Bestimmung der physikalischen Konstanten
    Dr. Hans Meyer
    http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-662-36698-1_2
    DOI: 10.1007/978-3-662-36698-1_2
    Abstract:
    Zusammenfassung
    Als „chemisch rein“ bezeichnen wir eine Substanz, wenn sie keinerlei durch die Methoden der Analyse nachweisbare Verunreinigungen enthält. Je nach der Richtung, in der sich die beabsichtigte Untersuchung erstreckt, ist ein verschieden hoher Grad der Reinheit vonnöten: So werden gewisse Verunreinigungen, z. B. ein wenig Feuchtigkeit, das Resultat einer Methoxylbestimmung kaum alterieren, während die Elementaranalyse dadurch vereitelt wird. Auf jeden Fall wird man trachten, die zu untersuchende Substanz tunlichst zu reinigen; als Kontrolle für das Vorliegen eines einheitlichen Körpers dienen dabei die physikalischen Konstanten. Erfahrungsgemäß zeigt fast jeder Körper, falls er nicht besonders zersetzlich ist, in krystallinischer Form einen bestimmten Schmelzpunkt, als Flüssigkeit konstanten Siedepunkt. Weitere wertvolle Daten können die Bestimmung der Löslichkeit resp. der kritischen Lösungstemperatur und des spezifischen Gewichtes geben.
    Erratum: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-36698-1_18
    http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-3-662-36698-1_18

    Analyse und Konstitutions Ermittlung Organischer Verbindungen 1916, pp 100-153
    Kriterien der chemischen Reinheit und Identitätsproben. Bestimmung der physikalischen Konstanten
    Dr. Hans Meyer
    Deutschen Universität zu Prag, Czech
    http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-662-36697-4_2
    Abstract:
    Zusammenfassung
    Als „chemisch rein“ bezeichnen wir eine Substanz, wenn sie keinerlei durch die Methoden der Analyse nachweisbare Verunreinigungen enthält. Je nach der Richtung, in der sich die beabsichtigte Untersuchung erstreckt, ist ein verschieden hoher Grad der Reinheit vonnöten: So werden gewisse Verunreinigungen, z. B. ein wenig Feuchtigkeit, das Resultat einer Methoxyl-bestimmung kaum alterieren, während die Elementar analyse dadurch vereitelt wird. Auf jeden Fall wird man trachten, die zu untersuchende Substanz tunlichst zu reinigen; als Kontrolle für das Vorliegen einer einheitlichen Substanz dienen dabei die physikalischen Konstanten. Erfahrungsgemäß zeigt fast jeder Körper, falls er nicht besonders zersetzlich ist, in krystallinischer Form einen bestimmten Schmelzpunkt, als Flüssigkeit konstanten Siedepunkt. Weitere wertvolle Daten können die Bestimmung der Löslichkeit, resp. der kritischen Lösungstemperatur und des spezifischen Gewichts geben.
    DOI: 10.1007/978-3-662-36697-4_2
    Erratum: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-36697-4_18
    http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-3-662-36697-4_18

  • JATdS November 21, 2014 at 12:32 pm

    Not a retraction, but an erratum, of a really old paper. Interestingly, papers published smack-bang in the middle of WW2.

    Vitamine in frischen und konservierten Nahrungsmitteln 1940, pp 132-200
    Vitamin C
    Dr. Gulbrand Lunde
    Forschungslaboratoriums, Norwegischen Konservenindustrie, Stavanger, Norwegen
    http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-642-99238-4_14

    Vitamine in frischen und konservierten Nahrungsmitteln 1943, pp 129-202
    Vitamin C
    Dr. Gulbrand Lunde, Lars Erlandsen
    Forschungslaboratoriums der Norwegischen Konservenindustrie, Stavanger, Norwegen
    A/S Lilleborg Fabriker, Oslo, Norwegen
    http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-662-36244-0_11
    Erratum: http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-3-662-36244-0_22

  • Post a comment

    Threaded commenting powered by interconnect/it code.