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Retraction Watch

Tracking retractions as a window into the scientific process

Danish committee rejects much of Klarlund Pedersen’s appeal of misconduct findings

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Klarlund Pedersen

Klarlund Pedersen

The Danish Committees on Scientific Dishonesty (DCSD, Danish acronym UVVU) has partially reversed a December 2013 finding of misconduct against a scientist in Denmark, but has upheld most of its ruling.

Bente Klarlund Pedersen, whose case was tied up with that of Milena Penkowa, another scientist in Denmark found guilty of misconduct, committed misconduct in four of 12 articles examined, not six, the DCSD said in a statement last week.

Here’s the English summary (the DCSD does not name scientists under investigation publicly, but Pedersen has confirmed this is about her): Read the rest of this entry »

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Written by Ivan Oransky

September 1, 2014 at 8:56 am

Weekend reads: DIY peer review, wildly exaggerated breakthroughs, and how to commit fraud without being caught

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booksAnother busy week at Retraction Watch. Here’s what was happening elsewhere: Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ivan Oransky

August 30, 2014 at 9:45 am

Posted in weekend reads

Australian university to repay $275K grant because of “misleading and incorrect” information

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Zee Upton, via QUT

Zee Upton, via QUT

Courtesy of The Australian, we have an update on a story we first covered in late 2012.

As we reported then:

A contested retraction in Stem Cells and Development has left the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) graduate student who fought for it in limbo, uncertain if he will earn his PhD. And many of those who didn’t want the paper retracted have a significant financial interest in a company whose work was promoted by the research — despite any lack of disclosure in the now-retracted paper.

QUT refused to give the student, Luke Cormack, access to an evaluation of the data in question, but also said that it welcomed an independent probe into a related $275,000 grant.

That probe is now complete, reports The Australian’s Julie Hare, and the QUT will be paying the grant back: Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Ivan Oransky

August 29, 2014 at 11:29 am

Second retraction appears for former University of Florida ob-gyn subject to ORI probe

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University of Florida

Chegini, via University of Florida

Nasser Chegini, an ob-gyn formerly on the faculty at the University of Florida who has been the subject of an Office of Research Integrity (ORI) inquiry for several years, has a second retraction.

Chegini is suspected of having used bogus data in some of his work — research backed in part by some $4 million in federal funding.

The new retraction involves a 2008 paper in Reproductive Sciences on which Chegini was senior author. Here’s the notice: Read the rest of this entry »

Déjà vu: Double pub in the same issue earns a retraction

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biomedchromAlways do a careful reading of your galleys, editors.

We imagine readers of Biomedical Chromatography’s special issue, “Reminiscences of Chang Kee Lim,” did some flipping back and forth when they found the same paper published twice.

Here’s the resulting notice for “Determination of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal in serum by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection after pre-column derivatization using 4-(N,N-dimethylaminosulfonyl)-7-hydrazino-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole”:  Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Cat Ferguson

August 28, 2014 at 11:30 am

Cancer researcher has correction upgraded to retraction

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mol endo coverRakesh Kumar, a researcher with six recent corrections and one retraction, has had one of those corrections upgraded to a retraction.

Here’s the unhelpful notice, from Molecular Endocrinology: Read the rest of this entry »

Journal takes down autism-vaccine paper pending investigation

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translational neurodegenerationAn article purporting to find that black children are at substantially increased risk for autism after early exposure to the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine has been shelved.

Although we don’t know if the events are related, the move comes amid claims that a CDC whistleblower has accused health officials of suppressing information about the link.

Not surprisingly, the prospect that the CDC has been sitting on evidence of an autism-vaccine connection for more than a decade has inflamed the community of activists wrongly convinced that such a link exists.

The paper, “Measles-mumps-rubella vaccination timing and autism among young african american boys: a reanalysis of CDC data,” was written by Brian Hooker, an engineer-turned-biologist and an active member of that community. It was submitted in April, accepted on August 5, and published on August 8.

Translational Neurodegeneration, which published the article earlier this month, has now removed it and posted the following notice: Read the rest of this entry »

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