Ask Retraction Watch: Should these papers be retracted?

protein scienceLast week, we reported on a new paper by Scripps Research Institute researchers in which they described how two of their previous papers had been based on mistaken interpretations. The authors wrote in their new paper that they were retracting the earlier works, but the journal had told them the papers would be corrected instead.

We had asked Protein Science editor Brian Matthews for clarification, and he emailed us late last week:
Continue reading Ask Retraction Watch: Should these papers be retracted?

Ask Retraction Watch: Is publishing my thesis verbatim self-plagiarism?

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Photo by Bilal Kamoon via flickr http://www.flickr.com/photos/bilal-kamoon/

Last week, we launched a new feature, “Ask Retraction Watch.” We invited readers to send in their questions. Here’s one we got right away: Continue reading Ask Retraction Watch: Is publishing my thesis verbatim self-plagiarism?

Ask Retraction Watch: Is this plagiarism?

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Photo by Bilal Kamoon via flickr http://www.flickr.com/photos/bilal-kamoon/

With this post, we’re going to try a new feature: Ask Retraction Watch. What we really mean by that is ask Retraction Watch’s readers, who time and time again have shared their expertise and made us smarter. So if you have questions you’d like posed in this space, find our contact info here.

Here goes. A reader asks: Continue reading Ask Retraction Watch: Is this plagiarism?

How should authors mark retracted papers on their CVs? Compare a chronic Lyme doctor with one from the Mayo

courtesy The CV Inn via flickr http://www.flickr.com/photos/the-cv-inn/

Soon after Retraction Watch launched, one of our readers posed an important question: How should researchers note that their papers have been retracted?

The question is important mostly for transparency reasons. (We’ve also wondered, however, whether authors whose papers have been retracted because of journal office errors should be forced to list those.) Should they remove any reference to retracted papers? Leave them, but mark them as retracted?

With that in mind, two examples. Continue reading How should authors mark retracted papers on their CVs? Compare a chronic Lyme doctor with one from the Mayo

It’s poll time: Should a retraction during graduate school mean losing your PhD?

photo by secretlondon123 via flickr http://www.flickr.com/photos/secretlondon/

A few weeks ago, we reported on the case of Emily Horvath, a promising scientist at Indiana University who admitted to falsifying data to make her results look better. Some of that data went into her PhD thesis. That prompted a Retraction Watch reader to ask whether scientists who commit such fraud should be stripped of their PhDs. We figured that was a good poll question, so let us know what you think.