Weekend reads: Death penalty for prof who killed whistleblower; psychiatry dept. shakeup after suicide in clinical trial; how scientific communication became highly profitable

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Retraction Watch turned 13 on Thursday. The week also featured:

Our list of retracted or withdrawn COVID-19 papers is up to nearly 350. There are now 42,000 retractions in our database — which powers retraction alerts in EdifixEndNoteLibKeyPapers, and Zotero. The Retraction Watch Hijacked Journal Checker now contains 200 titles. And have you seen our leaderboard of authors with the most retractions lately — or our list of top 10 most highly cited retracted papers?

Here’s what was happening elsewhere (some of these items may be paywalled, metered access, or require free registration to read):

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3 thoughts on “Weekend reads: Death penalty for prof who killed whistleblower; psychiatry dept. shakeup after suicide in clinical trial; how scientific communication became highly profitable”

  1. The lawsuit by Francesca Gino against the Data Colada group is awful. If they are wrong in their facts and logic, then write up a report showing this, and they will publish it on their website, and I’m sure they will correct any errors they have made. Sue Harvard all you like if you disagree with their processes, but going after whistleblowers who merely present the facts as they see them tells us who the real “thug” is in this situation.

  2. The name of the blog is 白楽 but if that is a name it’s Haku Raku, not Bai Le, which is a Mandarin reading of 白楽. But that’s also the name of a train station.

    The entire article reads like bullshit clickbait meant to rouse anti-Japan sentiment. The Chinese Communist Party does this incessantly to try to distract citizens from the party’s many and excessive failures, like corruption leading to the death of thousands in urban flooding events, or small stakeholders getting wiped out by real estate fraud, and the list goes on.

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