Weekend reads: A Nobel winner’s seventh retraction; Stanford’s president fights back; what should go into a retraction notice

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The week at Retraction Watch featured:

Our list of retracted or withdrawn COVID-19 papers is up to more than 300. There are now 40,000 retractions in our database — which powers retraction alerts in EndNoteLibKeyPapers, and Zotero. The Retraction Watch Hijacked Journal Checker now contains 200 titles. And have you seen our leaderboard of authors with the most retractions lately — or our list of top 10 most highly cited retracted papers?

Here’s what was happening elsewhere (some of these items may be paywalled, metered access, or require free registration to read):

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2 thoughts on “Weekend reads: A Nobel winner’s seventh retraction; Stanford’s president fights back; what should go into a retraction notice”

  1. Re: The Holden Thorp interview of Mike Lauer of NIH

    “nobody can participate in a Chinese talent recruitment program that is designed to move technology.”

    Again, this is a naïve understanding of the scope of state-supported espionage efforts of the Chinese government. *All* relationships with Chinese institutions come with the likelihood that *any* intellectual property involved in a project will be accessible by the Chinese government. No NDA or NIH policy will stop that from happening, with or without the willing cooperation of researchers in China or their international collaborators.

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