Weekend reads: Pharmacy dean’s book review retracted; scientists out at Emory after questions about links to China; MIT prof faces allegations about misplaced credit

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The week at Retraction Watch featured more troubles at Duke; a misconduct finding at Boston University; and a journal that tells authors 19% plagiarism is just fine. Here’s what was happening elsewhere:

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2 thoughts on “Weekend reads: Pharmacy dean’s book review retracted; scientists out at Emory after questions about links to China; MIT prof faces allegations about misplaced credit”

  1. ““’What’s most outrageous is they knew going back for decades about this man, and what they did is typical of large institutions: They protected the institution over the safety and welfare of the children,’” Paul Mones, an attorney representing 200 of Archibald’s former patients, told BuzzFeed News.” (Stephanie Lee, BuzzFeed)”

    If we need to grant immunity to the institution and anonymity to the perpetrator and gag orders in order to enable institutions to be able to denounce such behaviours safely, we should!

    It’s more important that such behaviours get adequately recorded, and provide data food for scientists on the topic, than anything else! If we can’t even get data, there’s no point claiming we’ll understand the depth of the issues, and victims will collectively stay silenced victims for much longer.

  2. An investigation at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences found research misconduct. (Jaime Adame, Arkansas Democrat-Gazette).

    Withdrawal: Discrepancy in insulin regulation between gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) platelets and placenta.
    Yicong Li, Anthonya Cooper, Imelda N. Odibo, Asli Ahmed, Pamela Murphy, Ruston Koonce, Nafisa K. Dajani, Curtis L. Lowery, Drucilla J. Roberts, Luc Maroteaux, and Fusun Kilic
    J. Biol. Chem. 2019 294: 9656. doi:10.1074/jbc.W119.009465

    Withdrawal: Glycosyl modification facilitates homo- and hetero-oligomerization of the serotonin transporter: a specific role for sialic acid residues.
    Deniz Ozaslan, Sophie Wang, Billow A. Ahmed, Arif M. Kocabas, John C. McCastlain, Anca Bene, and Fusun Kilic
    J. Biol. Chem. 2019 294: 9657. doi:10.1074/jbc.W119.009466

    Withdrawal: Serotonin transamidates Rab4 and facilitates its binding to the C terminus of serotonin transporter.
    Billow A. Ahmed, Brandon C. Jeffus, Syed I. A. Bukhari, Justin T. Harney, Resat Unal, Vladimir V. Lupashin, Peter van der Sluijs, and Fusun Kilic
    J. Biol. Chem. 2019 294: 9658. doi:10.1074/jbc.W119.009467

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