Weekend reads: Automated image duplication detection?; journal editor frustrations; cash for catching errors

We seem to be past the worst of our technical issues, so thanks for your patience with us over the past few weeks. (Some of the fixes came at a cost, so we would be remiss if we did not ask readers to consider a donation to support our work.)

The week at Retraction Watch featured coverage of a now-dropped lawsuit against PNAS, how much it costs to have a PhD dissertation written for you, and findings of misconduct by a top academic recruit. Here’s what was happening elsewhere:

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2 thoughts on “Weekend reads: Automated image duplication detection?; journal editor frustrations; cash for catching errors”

  1. An upcoming conference “has sparked controversy around Italy,” in part because it will host a speaker who retracted two papers that linked vaccines to autism. (Marta Paterlini, BMJ News)

    …and in part because of the other antivax cranks also invited by the organiser.

  2. “In the near future, I also plan to set bug bounties, i.e. sums of money you can earn if you find errors in my published work.”

    Donald Knuth has been doing this for ages, as I recall.

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