Weekend reads: How to create tabloid science headlines; sugar industry buys research; the citation black market

booksThe week at Retraction Watch featured a look at whether we have an epidemic of flawed meta-analyses, and the story of a strange case involving climate research and pseudonyms. Here’s what was happening elsewhere:

Like Retraction Watch? Consider making a tax-deductible contribution to support our growth. You can also follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, add us to your RSS reader, sign up on our homepage for an email every time there’s a new post, or subscribe to our daily digest. Click here to review our Comments Policy. For a sneak peek at what we’re working on, click here.

6 thoughts on “Weekend reads: How to create tabloid science headlines; sugar industry buys research; the citation black market”

  1. I find the referencing used in Bruce Knuteson’s paper quite astonishing:
    https://arxiv.org/pdf/1609.03223v1.pdf
    For example, one small sentence is supported by no less than 41 references, as follows: “Incremental improvements to the current system are proposed [50–90] [163].”
    I believe that this is a serious abuse of citations, and that possibly 40 references are receiving an undeserving citation. In my publishing rule book, one fact = one citation.

  2. In full appreciation of your hard sincere work on bringing the ongoing fraud / scam in Research studies into the notice of public, we wish to inform you that we cite your websites at every seminar and health course.
    While plagiarism in research studies is stealing a personal property of someone, the deliberate fraudulent research studies is tantamount to making fake currency to cheat the entire humanity.
    Best Regards.
    Talat Kamal
    http://www.unitedglobalhuman.org

Leave a Reply to Marco Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.