Retraction Watch

Tracking retractions as a window into the scientific process

Weekend reads: What’s the real rate of misconduct?; research parasites win awards; preprints’ watershed moment

with 3 comments

The week at Retraction Watch featured the strange story of a reappearing retracted study, and the retraction of a study showing a link between watching violent cartoons and verbal skills. Here’s what was happening elsewhere:

And an upcoming event: Bad Science And Good. Join NPR’s Richard Harris, Stanford’s John Ioannidis, and our Ivan Oransky for a discussion on Wednesday in New York, and also livestreamed.

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Written by Ivan Oransky

April 1st, 2017 at 9:28 am

Posted in weekend reads

Comments
  • From Morocco April 1, 2017 at 1:23 pm

    Now it’s somewhat “official”, using predatory journal is misconduct.
    In the revised edition of The European Code of Conduct for Research Integrity:

    3. Violations of Research Integrity:
    • […]
    • Establishing or supporting journals that undermine the quality control of
    research (‘predatory journals’). (p. 9)

    http://www.allea.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/ALLEA-European-Code-of-Conduct-for-Research-Integrity-2017-1.pdf

  • Ryder April 1, 2017 at 2:04 pm

    @scientific writing:
    It’s because the professors can’t allow themselves to write about any experiments they did and didn’t succeed, so they skip over the concept so the reviewers won’t think about it.
    Writing for reviewers, not learners.

  • Kim April 3, 2017 at 6:01 am

    “Debate emerges over whether or not the University of Munster should reveal the names of the three […]” –> Please, it’s Münster or Muenster. “Munster” is a French cheese from a commune of the same name.

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