Retraction Watch

Tracking retractions as a window into the scientific process

Weekend reads: The risks of spotlighting reproducibility; harassment = scientific misconduct?; trouble with funnel plots

with 2 comments

The week at Retraction Watch featured the case of a peer review nightmare, and a story about harassment by a would-be scientific critic. Here’s what was happening elsewhere:

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Written by Ivan Oransky

March 25th, 2017 at 10:00 am

Posted in weekend reads

Comments
  • Mitch March 26, 2017 at 9:41 am

    In my view, people like Ioaniddis, Shiffrin and Arnold and organizations like Retraction Watch should stress the importance of biomedical research while highlighting what needs to change. At present, they focus only on the negative – what needs to be fixed – and never mention the positive – why it’s worth fixing. It’s undeniable that life span has increased dramatically, deaths for cardiovascular disease have dropped dramatically, certain cancers have been cured, and numerous drugs have been developed as a direct result of NIH-supported research. Not to mention the industry and jobs that have been created as a result. Investment in the NIH, and science in general, is critical.

  • micheal March 26, 2017 at 11:31 pm

    I’d say good science will, and can, stand on its own without having to blow its own horn. Public can recognize that – they are not fools. Think of it this way..without watchdog websites like retraction watch and pubpeer, how many of the frauds among us would still be practising their dark art, and wasting public money? Now at least, those with dishonesty in their heart know the chance for consequences are much higher than it was a decade ago.

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