Second retraction appears for former accounting professor James Hunton

It took five months, but in December a second retraction popped up for disgraced accounting professor James E. Hunton. Hunton resigned his teaching post at Bentley University in December of 2012. An extensive investigation by Bentley showed that not only was the data in two papers falsified. Hunton also lied about non-existent confidentiality agreements and tried … Continue reading Second retraction appears for former accounting professor James Hunton

Former accounting prof adds his 33rd retraction

Former accounting professor James Hunton has added a 33rd retraction to his total, solidifying his position at #10 on our leaderboard. Hunton’s official total is 33.5, since one journal retracted only one section of a paper, making it a “partial” retraction. Most of those retractions came last year, the fallout from an investigation at Bentley University which concluded that … Continue reading Former accounting prof adds his 33rd retraction

Former accounting prof adds his 32nd retraction

Another retraction makes 32.5 for former accounting professor James E. Hunton, and earns him the #10 slot on our leaderboard. Though he resigned from his position at Bentley University in 2012, the story didn’t end there: In 2014, a university investigation found he’d committed misconduct in two papers. The, in June 2015, he notched 25 retractions all at once. The … Continue reading Former accounting prof adds his 32nd retraction

Weekend reads: Is failing to share data misconduct?; worst journal ever; Elsevier boycott

The big news this week at Retraction Watch was the release of more than two dozen retractions for accounting researcher James Hunton, and the sentencing of Dong-Pyou Han for scientific fraud (see more below). Here’s what was happening elsewhere:

Accounting professor notches 30 (!) retractions after misconduct finding

It began with a retraction due to a “misstatement” in November 2012, which led to an investigation that found the first author, James E. Hunton, guilty of misconduct.  Now, the floodgates have opened, and Hunton has 31 retractions under his belt, making him the newest addition to the Retraction Watch leaderboard. A month after the first retraction in … Continue reading Accounting professor notches 30 (!) retractions after misconduct finding

The Retraction Watch Leaderboard

Who has the most retractions? Here’s our unofficial list (see notes on methodology), which we’ll update as more information comes to light: Yoshitaka Fujii (total retractions: 183) See also: Final report of investigating committee, our reporting, additional coverage Joachim Boldt (96) See also: Editors-in-chief statement, our coverage Diederik Stapel (58) See also: our coverage Adrian Maxim … Continue reading The Retraction Watch Leaderboard

Accounting professor faked data for two studies, destroyed evidence: University report

The Bentley University accounting professor whose retraction we first reported on in November 2012 fabricated the data behind two papers, a university investigation has concluded. James E. Hunton, who resigned in December 2012:

Accounting professor resigns following retraction

An accounting professor at a Boston-area college has resigned a month after publishing a retraction that has sparked extensive discussion on Retraction Watch. The Boston Globe reported late last week that James E. Hunton will leave Bentley University on December 31, with a spokesperson telling the paper he was leaving for “family and health reasons.” Hunton … Continue reading Accounting professor resigns following retraction

Accounting fraud paper retracted for “misstatement”

The Accounting Review, a publication of the American Accounting Association, has retracted a 2010 paper, but the reason for the move is less than clear. The article, “A Field Experiment Comparing the Outcomes of Three Fraud Brainstorming Procedures: Nominal Group, Round Robin, and Open Discussion,” was by James E. Hunton, an award-winning accountancy prof at … Continue reading Accounting fraud paper retracted for “misstatement”