What do you do after painful retractions? Q&A with Pamela Ronald and Benjamin Schwessinger

2013 was a rough year for biologist Pamela Ronald. After discovering the protein that appears to trigger rice’s immune system to fend off a common bacterial disease – suggesting a new way to engineer disease-resistant crops – she and her team had to retract two papers in 2013 after they were unable to replicate their … Continue reading What do you do after painful retractions? Q&A with Pamela Ronald and Benjamin Schwessinger

Following up: Pamela Ronald publishes updated data following two retractions

Last year, we wrote about two retractions by Pamela Ronald and colleagues, after the group found that a bacterial strain they’d been using was contaminated. The group has now published a paper in PeerJ following their investigation into what went wrong. Ronald tells us the new paper, titled “The Xanthomonas Ax21 protein is processed by … Continue reading Following up: Pamela Ronald publishes updated data following two retractions

Pamela Ronald does the right thing again, retracting a Science paper

About a month ago, we reported on a retraction by Pamela Ronald, of the University of California, Davis, and colleagues. We noted then that this was a case of scientists doing the right thing. Ronald contacted us after that post ran, and let us know that there would be another retraction shortly. That retraction notice … Continue reading Pamela Ronald does the right thing again, retracting a Science paper

Weekend reads: Misbehaving medical academics; are phase I trials ethical?; the “sin” of mistakes

The week at Retraction Watch featured revelations about what happens when researchers unwittingly use a tool without permission, and a look at why women peer review less often than men. Here’s what was happening elsewhere:

Weekend reads: Seralini GMO-rat study retraction aftershocks; NEJM investigates conflicts of interest

Another busy week at Retraction Watch. Here’s a sampling of items about scientific publishing, research misconduct, and related issues from around the web:

Doing the right thing: Researchers retract quorum sensing paper after public process

We’ll say it again: We like being able to point out when researchers stand up and do the right thing, even at personal cost. In December 2011, Pamela C. Ronald, of the University of California, Davis, and colleagues published a paper in PLOS ONE,”Small Protein-Mediated Quorum Sensing in a Gram-Negative Bacterium.” Such quorum sensing research … Continue reading Doing the right thing: Researchers retract quorum sensing paper after public process