Weekend reads: The Trump administration gets something right about science; a journal refuses a metaphor; should journals use Nazi science?

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The week at Retraction Watch featured an expression of concern following a journalist’s questions; a kind of plagiarism that software will miss; and researchers who blamed a ghostwriter for plagiarism. Here’s what was happening elsewhere:

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3 thoughts on “Weekend reads: The Trump administration gets something right about science; a journal refuses a metaphor; should journals use Nazi science?”

  1. The CBC report (Karen Pauls) on the unconscionable scam carried out on patients with MS and ALS fails to identify why so-called “liberation therapy” was so readily accepted in Canada. While some may identify Canadians as more gullible, there is strong evidence that social media supported by glowing reports in certain sections of the press (especially The Globe and Mail and CTV television network) provided an environment where patients with these diseases sought out improbable therapies at rates higher than in most other civilized societies.

  2. Regarding the Diana Simon on plagiarism: As a librarian I find a number of things happening that impact citation practices:

    Many of our departments have (un)official policies for their grad students that only peer-reviewed works should be cited in their dissertations.

    Journals often have the same limitations.

    Students (regardless of home country) and faculty often cite when they are required to and no more often.

  3. Absolutely disappointed and may stop reading your site now.

    “…gets something right…” is a back-hand slam that has no place on this site.

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