Weekend reads: How junior scientists are mistreated; how to fix nutritional science; a journal does nothing after Monsanto ghostwriting claims

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The week at Retraction Watch featured a finding of plagiarism by a star health care policy researcher; a paper that contradicted itself; and the story of a researcher found to have committed misconduct on grants who is now publishing findings based on those grants. Here’s what was happening elsewhere:

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2 thoughts on “Weekend reads: How junior scientists are mistreated; how to fix nutritional science; a journal does nothing after Monsanto ghostwriting claims”

  1. “To keep authorship fair, journals in all fields should list authors based on their contribution rather than in alphabetical order.”

    Yeah, and obfuscate things even further by not hiding gratuitous authors (aka those with no actual input of any sort) somewhere in the middle of the list. Such a splendid idea, what could possibly go wrong!

  2. Protocols need not be in a specific, dedicated repository. It simply needs to be well documented and readily searchable. Ideally including a DOI. Method papers are generally highly cited – modifications and specific requirements for these modification may not easily find a place in many journals, but there are alternatives.
    This could be on a preprint platform, but also other somewhat less obvious ones such as Zenodo or even commercial ones like ResearchGate. Both of these mentioned also assign a DOI.

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