About these ads

Retraction Watch

Tracking retractions as a window into the scientific process

Journal of Virtual Studies retracts Second Life paper that was, um, virtually on its second life

leave a comment »

pellas

Nikolaos Pellas

Second Life is a virtual reality site in which you can “Experience endless surprises and unexpected delights in a world imagined and created by people like you.” Only Nikolaos Pellas, of Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, is now having two papers on virtual reality retracted because he apparently experienced endless surprises and unexpected delights in a world imagined and created by other people.

Here’s one notice from the Journal of Virtual Studies:

NOTICE OF RETRACTION

Virtual Reality in General and Second Life in Particular for Business/Technology Teaching in English (BTTIE) at Greek International Schools

Nikolaos Pellas
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece

This retracts the article “Virtual Reality in General and Second Life in Particular for Business/Technology Teaching in English (BTTIE) at Greek International Schools” (Journal of Virtual Studies 2010. 1(1). pp. 60-71).

The editors of the Journal for Virtual Studies want to notify readers of a retraction of the article “Virtual Reality in General and Second Life in Particular for Business/Technology Teaching in English (BTTIE) at Greek International Schools” by Nikolaos Pellas, published in 2010. It has come to the attention of the editors that this article is materially the same article as “Virtual Reality in General and Second Life in Particular for Business/Technology Teaching in English (BTTIE) at Asian International Schools” by Dr David W. Deeds, published in the 2007 International Conference on Convergence Information Technology (ICCIT) Proceedings [1].

An internal investigation has raised sufficient concerns about plagiarism; as such, we retract this article from the literature in accordance with guidelines and best editorial practices from the Committee on Publication Ethics.[2]

References

[1] Deeds, D. W. (2007) Virtual Reality in General and Second Life in Particular for Business/Technology Teaching In English (BTTIE) for Asian International Schools. Published in the 2007 International Conference on Convergence Information Technology (ICCIT) Proceedings. Retrieved on December 12, 2010 from http://www.aicit.org/jcit/papers/jcit2-4/6_jcit2_4.pdf

[2] Wager W, Barbour V, Yentis S, Kleinert S. Retractions: guidance from the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) London, UK: Committee on Publication Ethics; 2009. Retrieved on December 12, 2010 from: http://publicationethics.org/files/u661/Retractions_COPE_gline_final_3_Sept_09__2_.pdf

And here’s the other:

NOTICE OF RETRACTION: PLAGIARISM

Second Life: A Virtual World for Teaching Electronic Commerce

Nikolaos Pellas
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece

This retracts the article “Second Life: A Virtual World for Teaching Electronic Commerce” (Journal of Virtual Studies 2010. 1(1). pp. 25-43).

The editors of the Journal for Virtual Studies want to notify readers of a retraction of the article “Second Life: A Virtual World for Teaching Electronic Commerce” by Nikolaos Pellas, published in 2010. It has come to the attention of the editors that this article is substantively the same article as “Elearn: Towards a Collaborative Educational Virtual Environment” by Michailidou, A. and Economides, A.A, published in the 2003 Journal of Information Technology Education [1].

An internal investigation has raised sufficient concerns about plagiarism; as such, we retract this article from the literature in accordance with guidelines and best editorial practices from the Committee on Publication Ethics.[2]

References

[1] Michailidou, A. and Economides, A.A. (2003) Elearn: Towards a Collaborative Educational Virtual Environment. Journal of Information Technology Education, 3(3), p. 313-323.

[2] Wager W, Barbour V, Yentis S, Kleinert S. Retractions: guidance from the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) London, UK: Committee on Publication Ethics; 2009. Retrieved on December 12, 2010 from: http://publicationethics.org/files/u661/Retractions_COPE_gline_final_3_Sept_09__2_.pdf .

Retracting papers in the Journal of Virtual Studies is certainly one way to have studies live up to the journal’s name.

Given its provenance, one might think that irony would be a familiar term to an academic in Greece. But this pair of retractions has us wondering.

Hat tip: Rolf Degen

About these ads

Written by Ivan Oransky

September 30, 2013 at 11:39 am

We welcome comments. Please read our comments policy at http://retractionwatch.wordpress.com/the-retraction-watch-faq/ and leave your comment below.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 34,272 other followers

%d bloggers like this: